Mass Effect: Andromeda Review Round-Up - A Disappointing Follow-Up To The Original Trilogy?

By Melvyn Tan on Mar 21, 2017

Image source: Origin
Image source: Origin

While BioWare is known for their strength in making RPGs and telling stories, their new sci-fi RPG, Mass Effect: Andromeda, seems to have become known more for its questionable animations in recent days (an aspect that spawned terrible toxicity). Animations aside, early impressions by media outlets (unfortunately we didn't have the time to produce our own) indicated that the new Mass Effect wasn't very good.

Now reviews are out, and the final verdicts have been cast. On the bright side, Andromeda doesn't seem to be a total disaster or failure of a game. On the other hand, it seems to be quite a flawed game that probably won't satisfy any high expectations...

So, here's what critics have to say (Metacritic scores for all platforms are currently between the mid to high 70s):


DestructoidMass Effect: Andromeda spends a lot of time not really feeling like a Mass Effect game. If anything, it feels like a spin-off -- the sort of thing created by another studio that's unsure about what direction to take it. Like in the game itself, there are problems with the atmosphere. But Andromeda is very clear that it doesn't aim to be like the other Mass Effects. New beginnings, not funerals -- for better and for worse. (6.5/10)

Eurogamer - It's gripping stuff, and a reminder of the greatness of the Mass Effect trilogy - its intelligent reworkings of pulp sci-fi cliche, the taut splendour of its scenarios and aesthetic, the colour and dexterity of its writing. All that's still in here somewhere, I think. But then you pop out the other end of the mission, back into Andromeda's labyrinth of drudgery and obfuscation, and remember that you're a long way from home. (Unscored)

Game Informer - When taken as its own journey (and not in comparison to Shepard’s saga), Mass Effect: Andromeda is fun, and the important parts work. The narrative isn’t astounding, but keeps you invested and drives you forward. The combat is entertaining whether you're in single-player or multiplayer. The crew isn't my favorite, but I like them and they have some good moments. Even with its other problems, these are the largest forces shaping your experience with Mass Effect: Andromeda, and they make it worth playing. At the same time, I was often left looking through a haze of inconveniences and dreaming about the game it could have been. (8/10)

IGN -  Mass Effect: Andromeda is an expansive action role-playing game with a few great moments that recapture the high points of the landmark trilogy that came before it, and energetic combat and fantastic sound effects contribute to a potent sci-fi atmosphere. Without consistently strong writing or a breakout star in its cast to carry it through the long hours and empty spaces, however, disappointments like a lack of new races, no companion customization, and major performance problems and bugs take their toll. (7.7/10)

GameSpot - In many ways, Andromeda feels like a vision half-fulfilled. It contains a dizzying amount of content, but the quality fluctuates wildly. Its worlds and combat shine, but its writing and missions falter--and the relative strength of the former is not enough to compensate for the inescapable weakness of the latter. As a Mass Effect game, Andromeda falls well short of the nuanced politics, morality, and storytelling of its predecessors. For me, the series has always been about compelling characters and harrowing choices, so to find such weak writing here is bitterly disappointing. Yet even after 65 hours, I still plan on completing a few more quests. The game can't escape its shortcomings, but patient explorers can still find a few stars shining in the darkness. (6/10)

PC Gamer - Yet I'm also aware that when I'm in Mass Effect's zone a lot of these dry pros and cons don't seem to matter as much. This is a series that has always been good at getting under your skin, that has built its reputation on the moments when all of those disparate elements, good and bad, cohere into an adventure that feels like it's happening to you. Andromeda can still do that. It's not perfect. It's not consistent. But for a story about vast journeys and fresh starts, it also feels a little like coming home. (80/100)

0%
Happy
0%
Inspired
0%
Amused
0%
Sad
0%
Annoyed
0%
Angry
Melvyn Tan
About the Author
A secretly eccentric college student who mostly plays shooters on PC, although his gaming interests also extend to sneaking around in sizeable environments and slashing at things. He prefers his turn-based strategy games to involve miniatures and dice, and thinks that NieR: Automata's 2B is waifu material.
Comments
Subscribe to Edge today