Get To Know The Team Captains of COD: WWII 2018 Asia Championship

By Intan Mawarni on May 12, 2018

The anticipated Call of Duty World War II (COD: WWII) 2018 Asia Championship will take place at Battle Arena in Jaya Shopping Centre Petaling Jaya today. After the fierce competition in two preliminary qualifiers, only four teams are qualified for the final journey.

The time has come for the top four teams in Asia to go toe-to-toe in order to seize the opportunity to represent Asia at Call of Duty World League (CWL) Anaheim in California, USA from 15th until 17th June 2018. On top of that, the winning team will receive a total prize pool of RM80,011 (USD$20,000).

The four teams that will be competing in COD: WWII 2018 Asia Championship are RamPaGe Gaming, Avarice Gaming, Venom ReD and ItsNutty. Each of the four team comprises of diverse participants from all over Asia region such as Korea, Singapore, Malaysia and Philippines.

Recently, Gamehubs got to talk with the captains from each team to know more about their involvement in the competitive Call of Duty scene, their secret ritual before heading out to competitions and more.

Here are the top 5 things you need to know about the captains of RamPaGe Gaming, Avarice Gaming, Venom ReD and ItsNutty.

From left to right: Venom ReD captain Hazeeq ‘Black7roses’ Abd Rahman, Aurius ‘DinoNeo’ Kaite from ItsNutty, RamPaGe Gaming captain Hakiem ‘RanGer’ Tajudin and Avarice Gaming captain Amirul ‘Skywhite’ Haqim.
From left to right: Venom ReD captain Hazeeq ‘Black7roses’ Abd Rahman, Aurius ‘DinoNeo’ Kaite from ItsNutty, RamPaGe Gaming captain Hakiem ‘RanGer’ Tajudin and Avarice Gaming captain Amirul ‘Skywhite’ Haqim.

1. All the captains have played Call of Duty since they were little.

Venom ReD captain Hazeeq ‘Black7roses’ Abd Rahman from Malaysia got hooked with Call of Duty series when and his brother got him a PS3 console when he was 15 years old. Now at 22-years-old, Hazeeq said, “I never really thought that I get this far.”

Team captain Aurius ‘DinoNeo’ Kaite of ItsNutty from the Philippines can’t imagine a life without playing video games. He remembered, “One of my first childhood memories was playing PS1 at age 1.”. Aurius said he was 7 years old when he first played online matches in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 with his own PS3 that completely changed his life.

Having been introduced to the Call of Duty series in an early age, RamPaGe Gaming captain Hakiem ‘RanGer’ Tajudin of Malaysia told he was playing Call of Duty for fun before he chose to enter Call of Duty’s competitions after watching few videos online. He is an active player in Call of Duty tournaments from the year of 2013 until today.

The captain of Avarice Gaming, Amirul ‘Skywhite’ Haqim from Singapore revealed his record as a competitive Call of Duty player, “I’ve been playing competitive Call of Duty for almost 5 to 6 years now. The reason I got into it in the first place was because I heard that you can become a professional player in this game.”

2. Respect has to be earned, even from their own families.

It’s in any parents’ normal purview to think that playing video games is not going to earn you a lick of money, but Amirul of Avarice Gaming was able to prove them wrong. After taking home the 4th place trophy at 2018’s MYCG CyberFest Asia, his parents become one of his biggest supporters and his motivation to keep competing in the upcoming Call of Duty tournaments.

The hard-earned winnings along with lucrative cash prizes managed to convince Hazeeq’s parents to support his effort. Moreover, the captain of Venom ReD receives encouragement from his parents to start playing more and to be involved further in the professional eSports player career.

Hakiem, the captain of RamPaGe Gaming played the first title of Call of Duty while captain Aurius Kaite from ItsNutty found his calling through Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.
Hakiem, the captain of RamPaGe Gaming played the first title of Call of Duty while captain Aurius Kaite from ItsNutty found his calling through Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.

3. To be pro or not to be? That is the question.

When asked about their ultimate dream to be a full-time professional eSports player, all of them answered without an inkling of hesitation: “Yes, that’s the dream!”

Aurius Kaite of ItsNutty added, “To have some part in this (eSports) industry, it’s quite an achievement. You can be a streamer, you can be in the press or you can work with other organisation in various forms. The industry offers itself to work different skill sets but being the player right now, it’s one-in-a-lifetime chance. I’m pretty sure we all glad and humble of what we’ve achieved so far.”

4. Sleep is the best medicine

To prepare for this tournament, Hazeeq recommended for himself and his team members to sleep early. Avarice Gaming captain Amirul agreed on Hazeeq’s approach while he also spent time with his teammates to discuss about the strategies for Call of Duty matches.

However, Aurius Kaite has his own preparation before facing the music. “I like to listen to my favourite album all the way before the tournament,” he laughed, revealing his favourite album to be Neighbourhoods by Blink 182.

5. There is no shortcut for success.

Not only do you have to give your best, Hakiem insisted any aspiring Call of Duty professional player has to not only prepare their own set of goals that they can achieve but they have to commit to each goal. “Without commitment, you can forget about your dreams and goals to be a professional eSports player,” said the RamPaGe captain.

Amirul realised that there are youngsters out there who would want to follow in his footsteps. He offered his advice, “All I can say is for them is to be hardworking. Basically, just keep playing every single game until you achieve the drive and passion to play the game better.”

Venom ReD captain Hazeeq stated the eSports industry is always looking out for new talents. He believed if players enjoyed playing Call of Duty for fun as well as able to play their strengths well in the game, those players should consider registering themselves into more competitive Call of Duty arenas.

Aurius Kaite of ItsNutty shared that every budding Call of Duty professional players or eSports players in general is required to be able to represent themselves professionally. He elaborated, “You need to be able to represent yourself while you are capable to market yourself and interact with other players. You need to able to reach out and talk to the people in a professional manner.”

The calm before the storm. Picture courtesy of ESL Asia.
The calm before the storm. Picture courtesy of ESL Asia.

Hosted by ESL Asia and PlayStation Asia, the doors of COD: WWII 2018 Asia Championship will be open at 11am today and be a part of the excitement by getting your free tickets here. Be sure to visit the event’s Facebook page or go to ESL Asia’s Facebook page for more information.

Intan Mawarni
About the Author
Story-driven games like Uncharted and The Last of Us are my favourites. I write and play video games! Yay!
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