“You have dead pixels on your Switch? It’s not our problem,” says Nintendo

By Kin Boon on Mar 7, 2017

Image credit: Tech.Mic
Image credit: Tech.Mic

Out of all the issues that have been plaguing the Nintendo Switch at launch, dead pixels or light or dark patches can be a bit too annoying and distracting for players using the device in handheld mode. One would have hope that they’ll get to switch (no pun intended) to a new console if they encounter the issue, until they were told that it’s actually “normal” by Nintendo.

Most of the complaints were posted online by Switch owners in a Reddit thread, and this is what Nintendo has to say about this seemingly normal issue in a support document entitled “There are black or bright dots on the Nintendo Switch screen that do not go away, or there are dark or light patches on the screen”: “Small numbers of stuck or dead pixels are a characteristic of LCD screens. These are normal and should not be considered a defect.”

Dead pixels were common in the early days of LCD technology, with certain spots on the screen that doesn’t light up and remain dark at all times. PlayStation Portable owners also suffered from this issue on launch, but it has been significantly reduced over the years due to technological advancements and improvements in manufacturing techniques.

This is also not the first time that Nintendo has encountered the dead pixels problem, as seen in the launch for the original DS. The Japanese company offered replacements after being bombarded with complaints by the buyers, but it seems that history won’t repeat itself for Switch owners. Maybe they’ll change their stance again if you guys stage a massive protest? Who knows, it might solve your “normal” issue.

Source: The Guardian

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Kin Boon
About the Author
Just your 'average' media newbie. Have interest in gaming (duh), superhero series, and I enjoy getting engage in conversations about footy. With that said, slight biasedness might be present if we are talking about Chelsea FC. Hope to see the world with my own pair of eyes in the future instead of viewing it through Instagram or Snapchat filters.
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