[Review] Dropping In On Foxhole

By Nicolas See Tho on Jul 31, 2017

 

There are many games which shroud themselves in the WW2 moniker, whether it's Call of Duty, Battlefield, or Medal of Honor, but as far as these games go, it is always a tad bit too shallow for most wargaming fans to enjoy. However, a recent gem popped up on our radar and ever since it has gone into early access, there has been a huge spike in popularity, with over 200,000 downloads within the first few days. What game is this? My friends, let us bring you into a world of war through the eyes of Foxhole.

Foxhole is developed by Clapfoot Games, an independent studio based in Canada whose recent games are mostly Android based games, but has moved on to creating rich multiplayer games for the PC and console. Foxhole is their starting point when it comes to merging multiplayer access, with playable content. On our first glance, Foxhole looks like a WW2 simulator with all the tells from previous games, but the moment the trailer pointed out that each individual was a player, we were hooked. 

What pulls Foxhole away from the rest of the WW2 simulators is how it merges Real time strategy with the action of a first-person shooter platform. To put it simply, imagine playing Company of Heroes but with each unit being controlled by a single player. Now, place that in a scope whereby the map holds 100 players, and you have a foundation for one of the most interactive MMO's out on the market. 

The 2 warring factions in a persistent universe of constant war
The 2 warring factions in a persistent universe of constant war

Foxhole pits two warring factions against each other, whereby players choose between Wardens or the Colonials, neither are bad or good, and their stories are made from what players make of it. Everything from structures to weapons manufacturing is controlled by players. This means that players will have to cooperate together in order to get their war engine well equipped and operational. 

War is loud, and death is compulsory
War is loud, and death is compulsory

The combat system puts players on an emotional ride, bringing back an experience that ranges from Saving Private Ryan to Behind Enemy Lines. War is messy, war is gritty and war is unforgiving. There are no health bars or perks here, it only takes 2 bullets to end your life, and you will die many times. Each sector will have varying degrees of difficulty for capture and there will be times when players feel the feeling of despair when trying to break out of the stalemate, just like in actual war during the WW2 period. 

Trench warfare can be long, painfully stressful and full of grimdark
Trench warfare can be long, painfully stressful and full of grimdark

Players are able to interact with each other via Push to Talk, or with the integrated Discord channel within their faction, which adds another layer of immersion as you get to hear orders being passed down, desperate calls for a medic as the terrain explodes from mortar fire, players meeting logistic orders in a frenzy and many other instances like these create a new depth to the game. 

This map goes to show how big the fight over territory can be
This map goes to show how big the fight over territory can be

While the game has many good points, alas it is still an early access game and as such bugs are still rampant. Glitching vehicles, server spikes, and random deaths are all part and parcel of the game. There are also instances whereby player sprites can get stuck between two structures built too close to one another.

But at the end of the day, if you are looking for the next best MMO/RTS/Wargaming Simulator, then slam the Buy button on Foxhole via Steam with no regrets, as this is a one-of-a-kind game which brings you a type of cooperation that you will not find in other franchises. If you want to know more about the game, check out a new series of journals we will be adding on to the site in the near future based on war stories from Foxhole.

 

Nicolas See Tho
About the Author
A quirky gamer who has unrealistic expectations on survival RPGs, unrelenting hope for proper cooking mechanics and a love for tabletop gaming
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